Development of a generic client management web application on Azure platform

OData support
Supervisor:
Dr. Kővári Bence András
Department of Automation and Applied Informatics

Supporting customer management processes by IT solutions is a key focus in the insurance industry. Using the appropriate customer relationship management system makes the daily work of insurance agents more efficient, and thereby improves the company’s financial indicators as well. There is a wide range of products on the software market to choose from (such as Salesforce, Microsoft Dynamics CRM), however, these solutions often do not cover specific needs and make the buyer pay for features they do not even need.

In my diploma thesis I developed an insurance customer relationship management web application, implementing the most basic functions, as a result it can be seen as a starting point for any custom solution. During my work I tried to keep the website browser independent and pay attention to the optimal appearance on any resolution. I created an Office 365 developer subscription to integrate its services with the well-documented Office 365 API. Thanks to that, I developed a mailing and calendar modul with the reliable cloud service ensuring the related business logic and the storage for the entities (mail and event). I also linked the calendar with my own database to provide the possibility of defining customer events and giving feedback on the given events.

In addition to that, I thought about that some customers may come from other systems within the company, therefore I created a cloud service that allows us to load customers in from outside. To use all the benefits offered by asynchronicity I used an Azure Service Bus queue.

For the implementation I used the Visual Studio development framework. The web application was made on the ASP.NET MVC 5 platform with C#, and the user experience was improved by JavaScript technologies (jQuery, AJAX). Finally, I published the whole system into Azure cloud and made it available online.

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