Realization of simplified procurement process in the hungarian public administration using IBM technology

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Supervisor:
Dr. Martinek Péter
Department of Electronics Technology

The extensive amount of bureaucracy is a problem all around the world of state administration. This phenomenon, though in a shrinking extent, can be experienced in Hungary as well, not only regarding services enlisted by the citizens, but those enlisted by the agencies fulfilling administrative duties, too. Actually, the state administration is as much of a bearer of this problem, as citizens.

In state administration, just like in private sector, a huge amount of contracts are signed. Basically, in public sector, contractors are usually chosen via public procurement, but under a certain volume limit defined by law there is no need to use competition to decide between contractors. The contracts are signed after the selection. The two contract-signing processes are differ because some differences in conditions. In my opinion, regarding the public procurement, there is no point in separation of the selection and the contracting process, thus I chose to examine the contracts under the volume limit designated.

Hereby, in this thesis work I examined, modeled and optimized this simplified contracting process inside the boundaries set by the legal environment.

During the examination of the contracting, I got familiar with methods and tools for handling business processes, of which one of the best solution is IBM Business Process Management software package.

Afterwards, I implemented the process using IBM BPM components. The result was a product which simplifies the administration of the contracting using various user interfaces, automated subprocesses and a simulated storage system. After the completion, I tested the system thoroughly.

Based on the experiences gained this semester are concluded at the end of this thesis work, and development possibilities are provided regarding the state administration process, and IBM BPM system.

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