Health organizer and reminder system for Android platform

OData support
Supervisor:
Dr. Ekler Péter
Department of Automation and Applied Informatics

Even in these days mobile technologies become accessible to an increasingly wide range of people, still only a fragment of their possibilities are realized. Mobile devices help us in very diverse situations. Their medical utilization is still in it's infancy, even though international research has shown a thriving interest in it lately.

This thesis shows the developement process of a system that uses modern tools to aid the work of doctors, by helping to adhere to medications. First I analyze the existing solutions addressing the same problem. Drawing conclusions, I design a unique solution. The roles for the parts of this system will then be outlined, along with the most capable technologies to realize them. In the next step I implement the system, with special effort so that it perfectly functions as a subpart of a larger system. Then I describe the functions of the complete system, verifying that it suits the requirements. Finally I discuss further possibilities for improvement.

The main focus of this thesis is a Java software developed for the Google Android platform. In our scenarion the clients are conected to a server, which lets them store their data in a common central database. The same client program provides administrative and user-oriented functionality: administrators are capable of altering the database, namely record new patients, prescribe medicines, and monitor intakes: patients can see their own prescriptions, get reminders for them, and send feedback on their adherence back to the server.

Another significant component is the server. It enables the clients to communicate with the database. And the database backend is the same that powers the AAL Laboratory at the BAY-IKTI. That is the connection of this complete solution to a greater system, and how it achieves compatibility with the Windows Mobile-based medication reminder system.

Downloads

Please sign in to download the files of this thesis.