Developing a trade supporting Rich Internet Application in enterprise environment

OData support
Supervisor:
Dr. Ekler Péter
Department of Automation and Applied Informatics

Rapid development of information technology made it possible for everybody to find an application online for any task and use it without installation. Developers also find these thin client applications very common, there are well-specified design and implementation workflows for developing such applications.

These kinds of new technology, however, cannot be so quickly integrated to a bank’s IT infrastructure. An application is not allowed to be released without proper testing, change management is multi-level and the approval process requires managers in different roles to contribute. Also, there are a lot of legal regulations to comply with.

Even nowadays applications with a graphical user interface are made with thick client technology in such enterprise company. These have a few benefits but the need arises for simpler, faster applications which can be used with devices having less resources (e.g. tablets, smart phones). Thin client seems to be the best choice for these tasks. These technologies are just emerging throughout the bank’s infrastructure, there are still no complete workflow for developing thin clients which could fit properly to general expectations.

The goal of my thesis is to present the design and development of a system prototype which contains a global architecture and corresponding applications for it. The system’s goal is to make integration of thin clients easier to a global infrastructure with well-specified workflow. I present this design and development process through a specific application system that helps Equity Swaps trading. The thesis walks through the most important design and development tasks, beginning from the function specification, through the description of the used technologies, the design of the prototype, the implementation and testing, ending with the outline of possible future improvements.

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