Development of a Social Trip Organizer Application on Android Platform

OData support
Supervisor:
Dr. Ekler Péter
Department of Automation and Applied Informatics

Truth be told, carrying a cell phone, whether it be in one’s pocket or bag, has become a norm in everyone’s daily life. It is also true to say that a huge percentage of these phones fall into the category of smartphones. Because of this, it shouldn’t be a surprise that the market for mobile applications is constantly growing and these softwares have a more important role in our everyday lives day by day. This is especially true for younger generations who have an open mind toward technology-related innovations and development and who also like to enjoy life with life changing experiences. Traveling is an example of one of these experiences, and smartphones can help when it comes to organizing and realizing travels.

The aim of this paper is to present a trip organizer application for Android that helps to make traveling a reasonably social activity. Users can create profiles and are able to share their travel plans to other like-minded travelers. The main function of the software is to search for trips that match certain criteria, i.e. time and location, making it possible to organize trips with other users. In addition to this feature, the program also has a simple messaging interface for communication purposes.

The application can also be useful while currently on a trip. Through its built-in GPS sensor and map interface, it can show nearby users (locals or other tourists) to the traveler looking for company.

In the first part of the thesis, the main characteristics of the Android platform and the different technologies used in the development of the application are introduced. In the second part, the details of the design process and implementation of the program can be found, followed by chapters presenting the results of tests, the audit of the release-ready application, and finally a review of possible improvements with respect to the future.

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