Development of LTO Media Asset Management System

OData support
Supervisor:
Dr. Magyar Gábor Béla
Department of Telecommunications and Media Informatics

The explosive development of information technology has caused development in many other technology areas. The broadcast studios have always kept pace with the technological development, so keeping this way the camera tape cartridge has been replaced by hard disk recorders and memory cards. With this kind of equipment we can record large amount of data and content. While copying – from and to cartridges – was quite difficult and slow, nowadays with the file-based systems we can do this at much higher speeds. With the increase of the video quality, the data quantity has increased too.

With more data and better file portability the system’s information management gets weaker. For example, it is difficult to determine the content of a file just looking at the file’s name. According to industry standards, it isn’t a new tendency, that the files are irrelevant from the contents perspective. The media material preparation is based on content. So we get here a point as the video and audio files should be handled after their content, but the nowadays-used video coding algorithms are not based on content information.

Following the content grown tendency, the industry created solutions to manage these contents – named as assets – and these solutions allow storing and managing big quantities of any kind of data. In media informatics we call these solutions as media asset management systems.

The growth of managed content and the problems derived from, are present in the main broadcast studios of the world, but other smaller studios have to face the same problems. There are robust solutions available on the market, but these can’t be easily configured and paid by a small studio. Based on these facts and on the unavailability of a small-scaled system, the aim of my thesis is to design a small-scaled media asset management solution.

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