Automated Test Module for Man-Machine Language Commands

OData support
Supervisor:
Dr. Imre Sándor
Department of Networked Systems and Services

In my thesis, I’ll work on a problem, which is present in the field of Telecommunications.

Devices in these networks today are like computers, they are controlled by software. Communication with these devices can be achieved from a remote terminal via Man-Machine Language (MML). This is a specification language which is used in telecommunications to interact with the devices.

Development of a network device most of the time is equal to upgrading its software. In software development one of the most crucial step is testing. In telecommunications it’s even more important, because our network must have high stability.

Testing is done on virtual machines, which simulate network devices. These can be accessed remotely by MML commands. Every commands output has to be analyzed carefully, to make sure the software does what we want it to do. Doing this manually is a nerve-racking task.

This is why the idea of an automatic testing module came to mind. This program can execute MML commands and evaluate the results automatically.

In the following pages, you can get all the required knowledge that is required to understand the mechanics of the program.

In the prologue the MML is explained, and the problem is discussed. In later chapters we’ll review the specification of the module. Here the resources, the expected results and everything that we want the program to do will be explained. The implementation of the program chapter reviews the mechanics of the program in depth. The structure, the flow diagram and the used algorithms are explained.

Then the possibility of upgrading our program with new functionalities is discussed. Many new requirements were made during the testing of the module, some of which is still to be implemented.

Finally the modules place in a testing chain is reviewed. What steps must be made to make the testing work, and how to process the results.

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