Investigation and dimensioning of membrane resonator absorbers

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Supervisor:
Dr. Augusztinovicz Gusztáv Fülöp
Department of Networked Systems and Services

In literature, plenty of simple dimensioning methods are known which use a model consisting of a vibration system with a single degree of freedom to describe a membrane resonator. In reality the resonator is a clamped vibration system with multiple eigenmodes which is attached to a cavity with an own modal behavior as well. These facts challenge the applicability and precision of models using a system with a single degree of freedom.

The purpose of this thesis is discovering the mechanism and anticipated elision of sound absorbing devices based on the principal of membrane resonators. The model describing the system using lumped and/or distributed parameters needs to be compared with analytic and numerical calculations. The examination includes the interaction of fluid and structure in uncoupled and coupled states. The calculation results have to be supported with experimental modal analysis to create a scalable sound absorber which satisfies the practical needs.

In literature, plenty of simple dimensioning methods are known which use a model consisting of a vibration system with a single degree of freedom to describe a membrane resonator. In reality the resonator is a clamped vibration system with multiple eigenmodes which is attached to a cavity with an own modal behavior as well. These facts challenge the applicability and precision of models using a system with a single degree of freedom.

The purpose of this thesis is discovering the mechanism and anticipated elision of sound absorbing devices based on the principal of membrane resonators. The model describing the system using lumped and/or distributed parameters needs to be compared with analytic and numerical calculations. The examination includes the interaction of fluid and structure in uncoupled and coupled states. The calculation results have to be supported with experimental modal analysis to create a scalable sound absorber which satisfies the practical needs.

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