Examing navigation based solutions on Android platform

OData support
Supervisor:
Dr. Ekler Péter
Department of Automation and Applied Informatics

Nowadays, applications that offer navigation have become more and more widespread, thanks to the integration of GPS and network based positioning systems into numerous devices. During the past few years, the quality of navigation-based smartphone applications reached and even exceeded the quality of those that can be found on a professional navigation device, since services - like route planning - used to be paid for, are offered free of charge by these programs. Due to strong competition, a navigation-based application should serve additional user needs as well.

The objective of this thesis is to examine end-user needs and market trends by developing two navigation-based applications for the Android platform, both serving needs of different groups of potential users. One is a social networking navigation application based on the client-server architecture. By using it, one can find out where their friends are, or share, comment and rate points of interests or routes. Information about roadworks causing traffic jams could also be shared to be used by the system to optimize the planned route. The other software was made to fit in a market niche by satisfying sailors’ needs cruising on Lake Balaton in Hungary. Of course, in this case the main objective was not social-networking, but the application is set to offer unusual solutions for navigating.

As both solutions are based on the same idea, the social-networking navigation software is used to present the technological background, the details of the implementation and the testing stage of the development. Other solutions available on the market were also detailed as well as offering a solution in an uncommon field of navigation, like the one used in sailing.

At the end of this work, the results of the project and the gained experiences are summarized. Finally, the possible ways of further development are described.

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