Low-level motion planning of a quadruped robot

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Supervisor:
Dr. Drexler Dániel András
Department of Control Engineering and Information Technology

The very first robots in history were robotic arms and machine tools and they were

used primarily to help human work become more efficient or substitute monotoneous

human work in industry. Nowadays, there is a strong effort to build mobile robots,

which could be used for more general purposes. However, these are mostly in the state of early prototyping.

Beside the wheeled robots the walking robots are getting more and more attention. They are

walking by imitating the gaits of humans and animals. The purpose of their designers is

to send them to such terrains, which are inaccessible to wheeled robots.

Taking part of the current research projects at the Department of Control Engineering and Information

Technology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME IIT), this thesis deals with

the low-level motion planning of a quadruped robot-prototype. It uses the results

of earlier researches in the department and was made by a cooperation with Balint Gembicki

who submitted his thesis with the title "High-level Motion Planning of a Quadruped

Robot".

The thesis deals with the mathematical modelling and the low-level motion planning

of the quadruped robot - including the solution of its inverse kinematics. The results

of the computer simulation of the motion planning algorithms are described and analyzed

in the document. As an improvement relative to the earlier results the motion planning

algorithms were implemented in hardware - in embedded enviroment. In order to join the

high-level path planning with the low-level motion planning, an interface

was developed. The low-level realization of the interface was produced by this work as well.

BME IIT's quadruped robot is now able to run the low-level motion planning algorithms

on his own and can follow any path produced by the high-level motion planning.

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