Design of pulse oximeter

OData support
Supervisor:
Dr. Benesóczky Zoltán
Department of Measurement and Information Systems

The aim of my thesis is to examine several questions related to pulsoxymetry. I describe the theoretical basis of the measurement method and I demonstrate some already published algorithms where I compare their robustness and complexity. I give a brief description of the calibrational possibilities. I rank some sensor devices available on the market in terms of robustness and the measurement accuracy.

On the breadboard made for the MAX30100 sensor I tested the software and the implemented algorithm. I elaborate some concerns of software design for low-power devices. I investigate the structure of different layers and their role in terms portability and further development. I present the basic functions of the FreeRTOS system I used. I examine the dependency of the software and the algorithm on the hardware.

I developed an application and tested it on a breadboard made for the MAX30100 sensor. I elaborate some concerns of software design for low-power devices. I investigate the structure of different layers and their role in terms portability and further development. I present the basic functions of the FreeRTOS system I used. I examine the dependency of the software and the algorithm on the hardware.

In my thesis I designed the circuit diagram of a complex prototype, which is able to process the signals of three MAX30100 sensors. The circuitry also comprises one flash memory and a Bluetooth LE- capable microprocessor. When selecting the components, low consumption was a major priority. The prototype target area is the market for smartwatch like data acquisition sensors.

When summarizing the results, I will briefly examine the sampling frequencies and measurement noise issues.

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