Investigations on frequency regulation capability of electric cars using DIgSILENT Power Factory

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Supervisor:
Dr. Farkas Csaba
Department of Electric Power Engineering

The Hungarian Power System’s main task is to properly supply the customers, while providing a relatively economical operation. Nowadays most of the generators are using fossil fuels. Since the sources of these fuels are limited, we have to consider that their price will rise in the near future. Furthermore in the last few years the environmental protection became more important, therefore the power plants with high emission will be charged with extra fees. For that very reason the development of low zero CO2 emission technologies became very important too. To achieve the proper effect, the main key is not just spreading these technologies, but to reach a significant level. With the current power system this would endanger the ability of stable operation, that's why the Hungarian system needs new, fast regulating capacity. There are many ways to solve this problem. One possible way to create better frequency stability is to install controllable energy storage capacity in the system. It is also possible to use the batteries of electric vehicles for controlling purposes, therefore a rapid increase in the number of electric vehicles could also provide adequate solution for the mentioned problem. It is also important to note, that the consumed electricity for transportation could rise sharply, which could cause overloading and quality problems on the power system.

My thesis’s aim is to demonstrate the possibility of using distributed electric vehicles for frequency control and to create a Vehicle to Grid model in DIgSILENT Power Factory, which can implement the above mentioned controlling duties. With this model it is possible to test the frequency stability of the system with different parameters, to evaluate the efficiency of the regulation and to specify the optimal number of electric vehicle.

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